Home / Lifestyle / Arts & Culture / Dia de los muertos in Miami [Photo Essay]
Elaborate face painting is a defining characteristic of dancers participating in the celebration of Dia de Los Muertos.
Elaborate face painting is a defining characteristic of dancers participating in the celebration of Dia de Los Muertos.

Dia de los muertos in Miami [Photo Essay]

History Miami Museum and the Mexican Consulate celebrated Dia de los Muertos on Wednesday, Nov. 1.

Dia de los Muertos is a Mexican tradition that honors the dead through lively festivities. During the celebration, guests painted their own sugar skull and viewed an altar created by the Instituto Cultural de Mexico. Guests were also able to taste authentic Mexican food and enjoy traditional music and dance performances by the Ameyal Mexican Cultural Organization.

— Elizabeth Soza, South Florida News Service

This is the amazingly colorful altar, created by Insituto Cultural de Mexico for the event.

This is the amazingly colorful altar, created by Insituto Cultural de Mexico for the event.

Here a dancer performs a contemporary and traditional fusion dance that tells the story of the road to the land of the dead.

Here a dancer performs a contemporary and traditional fusion dance that tells the story of the road to the land of the dead.

Musicians played traditional folk music from Mexico and also provided live music accompaniment to the dances.

Musicians played traditional folk music from Mexico and also provided live music accompaniment to the dances.

Elaborate face painting is a defining characteristic of dancers participating in the celebration of Dia de Los Muertos.

Elaborate face painting is a defining characteristic of dancers participating in the celebration of Dia de Los Muertos.

This is a Garifuna dancer. The Garifuna people are mixed-race descendants of West African, Central African, Island Carib, European, and Arawak people. Garifuna live in Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua and other countries throughout Central American and the Caribbean.

This is a Garifuna dancer. The Garifuna people are mixed-race descendants of West African, Central African, Island Carib, European, and Arawak people. Garifuna live in Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua and other countries throughout Central American and the Caribbean.

The dancer in the center, a Garifuna, performs alongside two others of Garifuna descent.

The dancer in the center, a Garifuna, performs alongside two others of Garifuna descent.

This part of the performance is called "La Bruja" - which tells the story of death.

This part of the performance is called “La Bruja” – which tells the story of death.

This is a comedic dance, meant to show how humans do not take life seriously, and joke around. The dancers dance, tap dance and act foolish to interpret this idea.

This is a comedic dance, meant to show how humans do not take life seriously, and joke around. The dancers dance, tap dance and act foolish to interpret this idea.

The dance shows how humans take life for granted.

The dance shows how humans take life for granted.

Mexican artist, Jorge Dominguez Cruz, created new paintings throughout the celebration.

Mexican artist, Jorge Dominguez Cruz, created new paintings throughout the celebration.

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