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Demographics, wealth and voting locations in Miami-Dade [Data Visualization]

There’s no doubt that this election season has been tumultuous. With Miami-Dade County having a key role in how the state will swing as a whole, its racial, relative wealth and age may provide some insight as to why people voted the way they did. This is especially true for those aged 20-24. The visualizations below, based on voter registration data taken from the Florida Secretary of State in August 2016, attempt to shed some light on this.

By Alexandra Rodriguez
South Florida News Service
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Racial Demographics

This visualization overlays racial makeup by Zip code by median income in Miami-Dade County. Much of the black population in Miami-Dade County lives in the northern part near the border of Broward County. In that section of the county, the median household income ranges between $0 and $47,000. The Hispanic population is distributed throughout the entire county, and is not the majority population in some areas. There are only two pockets where those who are non-Hispanic white are the majority population.

Party Affiliation

Depicted in the pie chart is the percent of young voters, broken down by major party affiliation. The largest political group among those between 20-24 is the Democratic Party with 44.1 percent, followed by No Party Affiliation with 40.7 and the Republican Party with 15.2 percent.

Voting Locations

This map show all voting precincts in Miami-Dade County. The variations of blue and green on the map show the 2016 populations across the county by zip code. There seems to be an even distribution across the majority of the county.

 

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